Inspiration TV

Inspiration TV

Big News for The Angel! Inspiration.tv, International will be airing The Angel of Marye's Heights in 2014. INI.TV reaches more than 171 countries across the world and over 100 million viewers. We are pleased to have our film air on their network and to the inspired millions that will be able to share in Richard Kirkland's heroic deed. 

Our Latest Film

Our Latest Film

Right Stripe Media is bringing to the big screen the story of Bill Irwin, who with his dog Orient, became the first blind person to thru-hike the 2,100 mile Appalachian Trail.   Visit the films temporary site at BlindCourageTheMovie.com.

Now On-Demand

Now On-Demand

Watch "The Angel of Marye’s Heights" at Amazon On-Demand. For just $9.99, you can buy the digital version. Of course if you would also like all of the bonus features, we recommend that you purchase the DVD over at our STORE. We also appreciate any comments left under the Customer Reviews section.

Right Stripe Media

Right Stripe Media

Right Stripe Media was formed in 2010 when Clint Ross, an independent filmmaker, partnered with historian and author Michael Aubrecht. Both principals came together to produce the critically acclaimed Civil War documentary The Angel of Marye’s Heights. Following the success of this highly original and dramatic piece, Clint and Michael decided to form a production company geared towards bringin...

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AMH at Brompton
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Above: President of the UMW, Richard V. Hurley and his wife, were presented a copy of the documentary at their home Brompton, after the public viewings. Left to right, James Anderson, treasurer of Friends of the Fredericksburg Area Battlefields, President Hurley and his wife Rose, and John Cummings, chair of Friends of the Fredericksburg Area Battlefields. (Photo by kind assistance of Abbie McGhee, UMW staff, Courtesy of Spotsylvania Civil War Blog) 

On September 24, 2011 Richard V. Hurley, President of the University of Mary Washington, was presented with a complimentary copy of “The Angel of Marye’s Heights” courtesy of Right Stripe Media. The DVD was presented by local historian (and cast member) John Cummings following two screenings of the film at the Jepson Alumni Center during UMW’s Annual Family Weekend. As leader of the university, President Hurley’s family residence is located in historic Brompton Manor which sits atop Marye’s Heights and overlooks the Richard Kirkland Monument on the Fredericksburg National Battlefield. Each year during Family Weekend the Hurley’s graciously open their landmark home to the public for student-led tours. This opportunity fits perfectly with the screening of “The Angel” as university guests can first learn about the Battle of Fredericksburg and then literally cross the street and tour one of the last remaining witness homes. According to a local tourist promo: 

Brompton was built in 1836 by John Lawrence Marye and is currently home to the dean of the Mary Washington College. Inside the house (which is seldom open for public tours) are two Italian fireplace mantels which were meant for the White House, but never arrived due to imperfections. The Maryes bought them instead. During the Civil War, General Lee used Brompton for fortification against attacks on Marye’s Heights in the Battles of 1862 and 1863. During the Battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862, the famed Washington Artillery of New Orleans was posted around the Marye House, here on Marye’s Heights. Colonel J.B. Walton, the commanding officer, had his headquarters in the house. The commander of the Fredericksburg Artillery, Edward A. Marye, lived in his family's house before the war. This unit, and Alexander's Reserve Battalion, which relieved it during the afternoon, helped hurl back seven Federal charges. His battery was posted four miles south of this position during the battle. During the Wilderness and Spotsylvania operations of May 1864, the Marye House served as a Federal Hospital, and the wounded lay outside under the trees, one of which still stands. Known locally then and now as Brompton, the house now serves as the home for the president of Mary Washington College.  

Here is an image taken of Brompton during the Civil War that clearly depicts the damage that was inflicted on the residence at the Battle of Fredericksburg:

  

Here is the restored Brompton as it stands today: